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Bible Books

Old Testament Books

The Book of Genesis (1-18): Genesis, "the book of beginnings." One of the biggest controversies between religious scholars, scientist and archaeologist, is how the earth was formed and how old it is. Many religious scholars believe that the earth was created 6,000 years ago, contradicting proof of a dinosaur or Stone Age millions of years old. On the other hand many scientist and archaeologist believe in millions of years of evolution forming the world on it's own, leaving out the possibility of creation. read more

The Book of Genesis (19-34): Lot welcomed the two angels as they came to the city gate of Sodom. The city gate (seat of judgment), was where the leaders of the city hung out. Now it appears that Lot is a real citizen, or one of the leaders of Sodom. read more

The Book of Genesis (35-50): Bethel (house of God), is where Jacob had his first encounter with God. Purification being necessary in going up to Bethel, "The House of God." read more

The Book of Exodus (1-20): Exodus, Greek, "The way out, or going out." It is the book of Redemption. The second book of Moses. Connecting Exodus, closely with Genesis, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. read more

The Book of Exodus (21-40): The Israelites were not allowed to enslave their fellow Israelites as permanent slaves. Only for six years could they be a slave and then they were set free. read more

The Book of Deuteronomy (1-21): Deuteronomy means "second law." It refers to the covenant between God and Israel, presented in three sermons by Moses. It is the last of the five books that were written by Moses, around the time Israel was about to enter the promise land. read more

The Book of Deuteronomy (22-34): Deuteronomy is a reminder that God is worthy of worship and obedience. The book is better know as the old school master or law giver, and is for our own protection. read more

The Book of Joshua: Joshua "Yehoshua" or "Yeshua" (meaning Yahveh savior or the Lord saves). The book of Joshua was written around 1,400 - 1,370 B.C. and marks the fulfillment of the Exodus of the Israelites from Egypt. read more

The Book of Judges (1-14): Judges is the seventh book of the Hebrew and Christian Bible. It contains the history of Biblical judges who were divinely inspired leaders whose knowledge of Yahveh allows them to act as champions for the Israelites from oppression by foreign rulers. read more

The Book of Judges (15-21): The story follows a pattern that the people were unfaithful to Yahveh and He therefore delivers them into the hands of their enemies; the people repent to Yahveh and plead for mercy, which He then sends in the form of a leader or champion, a judge. read more

The Book of Ruth: The Book of Ruth (a love story), was always read by the levitical priests at Passover. This book gives credentials and link to the the Genealogy of King David and Jesus Christ "the son of David." read more

The Book of 1 Samuel (1-16): The books of Samuel continue the theological history of the Israelites which explains God's law for Israel under the guidance of the prophets. read more

The Book of 1 Samuel (17-31): According to Jewish tradition the book was written by Samuel, with additions by the prophets Gad and Nathan. read more

The Book of 2 Samuel (1-19): The books of Samuel continue the theological history of the Israelites which explains God's law for Israel under the guidance of the prophets. According to Jewish tradition the book was written by Samuel, with additions by the prophets Gad and Nathan. read more

The Book of 2 Samuel (20-24): The story of the Ark of the Covenant that follows tells of Israel's oppression by the Philistines, which brought about Samuel's anointing of Saul as Israel's first king. read more

The Book of Ezra: Ezra (meaning help), was written around 458 BCE. and tells us how the priesthood became polluted. read more

The Book of Nehemiah: Nehemiah (meaning comforted of the Lord), was the cup-bearer to the king of Persia around 445-444 B.C. At the time of Nehemiah, the Lord was comforting Judah. Nehemiah was not a Levite priest, but was considered a prince of Judah, giving him some royal blood. read more

The Book of Esther: Esther (a star), the Persian name Hadassah (myrtle). Myrtles meaning the righteous prophets. (Zechariah 1:8). The book of Esther takes place during the Persia rule (539 B.C.-331 B.C.). read more

The Book of Ecclesiastes: Ecclesiastes is a Latin word. In Hebrew it means (to call assembly or the preacher), written to the man walking under the sun. (Written 29 times in this book). This book teaches us how to live in these flesh bodies. read more

The Book of Isaiah (1-22): Isaiah is called "The Book of Salvation." (Written to Judah and Jerusalem). read more

The Book of Isaiah (23-41): The name Isaiah means "the salvation of the Lord" or "the Lord is salvation." read more

The Book of Isaiah (42-58):  Isaiah is the first book containing the writings of the prophets of the Bible. read more

The Book of Isaiah (59-66): The author, Isaiah, who is called the Prince of Prophets, shines above all the other writers and prophets of Scripture. His mastery of the language, his rich and vast vocabulary, and his poetic skill have earned him the title, "Shakespeare of the Bible." read more

The Book of Jeremiah (1-12): Jeremiah meaning "Yahveh exalts" (the launching forth one)! Jeremiah is the name traditionally credited with authoring the Book of Jeremiah, I Kings, II Kings, and the Book of Lamentations with the assistance and under the editorship of Baruch Ben Neriah, his scribe and disciple. read more

The Book of Jeremiah (13-29): Jeremiah was the second of the major prophets of the Hebrew Bible. read more

The Book of Jeremiah (30-47): God's personal message to Jeremiah, "Attack you they will, overcome you they can't, was fulfilled many times in the Biblical narrative. read more

The Book of Jeremiah (48-52): Jeremiah was attacked by his own brothers, beaten and put into the stocks by a priest and false prophet, imprisoned by the king, threatened with death, thrown into a cistern by Judah's officials, and opposed by a false prophet. The book of Jeremiah was written to the house of Israel. read more

The Book of Ezekiel (1-16): Ezekiel, meaning (God will strengthen), lived at the time of the prophet Jeremiah. The time of the destruction of Judah and the Babylonian captivity. Ezekiel describes his calling to be a prophet, by going into great detail about his encounter with God and four living creatures or Cherubim with four wheels, or (vehicles), that stayed beside the creatures. read more

The Book of Ezekiel (17-31): Ezekiel was one of the captives taken to Babylon. Ezekiel as well as Daniel, prophesied in Babylonia. read more

The Book of Ezekiel (32-44): Ezekiel was a priest (Ezekiel 1:3), carried away eleven years before the destruction of the city temple (Ezekiel 1:2, 33:21, 2 Kings 24:14). He was married; and his wife died in the year when the siege of Jerusalem began. read more

The Book of Ezekiel (45-48): Chapters 40-48 of the book of Ezekiel, describe end time prophecies that give us insight to the book of Revelation. read more

The Book of Daniel: The name "Daniel" means "God is my judge." According to the Biblical book of Daniel; at a young age Daniel was carried off to Babylon where he was trained in the service of the court, under the authority of Ashpenaz. Ashpenaz was in charge of King Nebuchadnezzar's personnel palace. read more

The Book of Hosea: Hosea (meaning salvation), son of Beeri, and the first of what many call the minor prophets. However, there is nothing minor about this book. Hosea was a prophet to the ten tribes (Northern Kingdom), but he had warnings for Judah also, as well as promises of future blessings. read more

The Book of Joel: Joel (Yahweh is God, The Lord is God), was said to be the son of Pethuel. The book was written around 488-477 B.C. He prophesied not like Hosea among the ten tribes, but he was a prophet of Judah. The Book of Joel is apocalyptic in nature, referring to a future invading army of locust in the day of the Lord. read more

The Book of Amos: The Book of Amos is a prophetic book of the Hebrew Bible, one of the twelve minor prophets. Amos corresponds to Hosea, the link being Jeroboam II (II Kings 14:27). Being a native of Judah, he prophesied in Israel, and against Israel. read more

The Book of Obadiah: The canonical Book of Obadiah (servant of Yahveh), is an oracle concerning the divine judgment of Edom and the restoration of Israel. The text consists of a single chapter, divided into 21 verses, making it the shortest book in the Hebrew Bible. read more

The Book of Jonah: The book of Jonah was written around 690 B.C. in the time of Jeroboam II and the early years of Uzziah. Modern critics declare that the book is a "combination of allegory and myth." read more

The Book of Micah: The Book of Micah was written around 632 to 603 B.C. "in the days of Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah." Micah, "Mikayahu" (meaning who is like Yahveh)? Micah was a an 8th century B.C. prophet from the village of Moresheth in Judah. read more

The Book of Nahum: The Book of Nahum (meaning comforter), was written around 603 B.C., and corresponds with the book of Jonah, which also has Nineveh for its subject. read more

The Book of Habakkuk: The Book of Habakkuk (meaning embrace), was written around 625 B.C. according to traditional dating, but in the chronology given in Appendix 50 (King James Companion Bible), it was written about 515 B.C., or 110 years later. read more

The Book of Zephaniah: The Book of Zephaniah (meaning the Lord conceals, or the Lord protects), was written around 518 B.C. between the twelfth and the eighteenth year of Josiah, or about three years before the fall of Nineveh. read more

The Book of Haggai: The Book of Haggai (meaning my holiday), was written around 410 B.C. in the second year of Darius (Hystaspis), sixteen years after the decree of Cyrus. Haggai was the first prophet by whom "God spoke" after the return. read more

The Book of Zechariah: The book of Zechariah (remembered by Yahveh?), many believe the book was written between 520 and 518 B.C., and the Companion bible records it around 410-403 B.C. The temple was completed in the sixth year of Darius, and was dedicated in Adar, 405 B.C. Read appendix 51 (Companion bible for reference). read more

The Book of Malachi: The book of Malachi (Gods messenger), is the last book of the old testament. Written  between 440 - 400 BC, He tells the people to turn back to God and points them to the future coming of the promised Messiah, who will be preceded by an appropriate forerunner. read more

New Testament Books

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